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Faron Young - Three Great Tracks

14 February 2012







Faron Young (February 25, 1932 – December 10, 1996) was an American country music singer and songwriter from the early 1950s into the mid-1980s and one of its most successful and colorful stars. Hits including "If You Ain't Lovin' (You Ain't Livin')" and "Live Fast, Love Hard, Die Young" marked him as a honky tonk singer in sound and personal style; and his chart-topping singles "Hello Walls" and "It's Four in the Morning" showed his versatility as a vocalist. Known as the Hillbilly Heartthrob, and following a movie role, the Young Sheriff, Young's singles reliably charted for more than 30 years. He committed suicide in 1996. Young is a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame. Young signed with MCA Records in 1979 but the association lasted only two years. Nashville independent label Step One signed him in 1988 where he recorded into the early 1990s (including a duet album with Ray Price), then withdrew from public view. Though young country acts like BR549 were putting his music before new audiences in the mid-1990s, Young apparently felt the industry had turned its back on him. That, and despondency over his deteriorating health, were cited as possible reasons why Young shot himself with a 10 Ga. shotgun on December 9, 1996. He died in Nashville the following day and was cremated. His ashes were spread by his family into Old Hickory Lake outside Nashville, with Johnny and June Carter Cash in attendance. A sad end to a true country Legend. just listen to the man and you'll see why.

Faron Young

Capitol Records promotional photo
Background information
Birth nameFaron Young
Also known asThe Hillbilly Heartthrob
The Singing Sheriff
BornFebruary 25, 1932
OriginShreveport, LouisianaUnited States
DiedDecember 10, 1996 (aged 64)
GenresCountry music
Occupationssinger, songwritermovie actor
Instrumentsguitar
Years active1951–1994
LabelsGothamCapitolMercuryMCA,Step One

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